Preparing To Purchase A Home Don’t buy a home because it’s a buyer’s market or just because of low mortgage rates. Buy a home because you want to be a homeowner. Buy a home because you’re settling down and need a place for live for at least five years. And only buy a home if you’re financially ready. How to Prepare to Buy Your First Home; How Much House Can You.

Watch Bankrate.com Chief Financial Analyst Greg McBride describe a few metrics that can help you calculate how much you can afford. Originally Posted at:.

Finally, keep in mind how much you can afford to borrow without putting the rest of your financial plans on hold. This can help you build a stronger future, because you’ll be better informed and better equipped to be a successful homeowner.

Calculate How Much House You Can Afford. While it can be tempting to immediately start browsing the listings, the first step in knowing your budget is to take these into consideration: Your monthly take-home pay. The size and terms of the loan you’ll take out.

The cost for PMI varies between lenders and is generally .3% to 1.5% of your total mortgage amount. If your loan is for $250,000, you’ll be paying another $62.50 to $312.50 per month. With such a wide difference in cost, it’s important that you consider the PMI rate when shopping for a lender.

Trying To Buy A House Valuable Lessons for First-time home buyers. But you live and you learn. And in the end, that’s all anyone can do. With that said, I wanted to share some of our mistakes and other things we’ve learned since we bought our house, in case they might prove helpful to someone else going through the home buying process.

Increase your down payment (if you can) The down payment is what you pay once you’ve committed to a property. It could be anywhere from 0%-20% of the home’s price, and sometimes even more than that. How much you put down is up to you. But the more money you put down, the more skin you have in the game. And the more skin you have in the game, the lower your monthly mortgage payments will be.

Use this simple rule to help you figure out how much you can comfortably afford. If your maximum household expenses and total household debt are at or lower than 28 percent and 36 percent, you should.

If you earn $56,516, the average household income, you can afford $1,695 in total monthly payments, according to the 36% rule. The rule, which measures your debt relative to your income, is used by lenders to evaluate how much you can afford.

. officers will push to get you as much mortgage as you are willing to take. And with the emotion and adrenaline-charged thrill of buying your dream house, you might be tempted to take on more than.

 · A debt-to-income ratio, or DTI, is the industry standard for establishing how much house you can afford. It’s calculated by taking the total amount of your new mortgage payment plus your existing monthly debt payments (think: car payment, student loan, outstanding credit card balances) divided by your gross monthly income.